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File #: 12-1158    Version: 2
Type: Agenda Item Status: Approved
File created: 9/10/2012 In control: Board of Supervisors
On agenda: 9/25/2012 Final action: 9/25/2012
Title: Department of Transportation recommending the Board approve the proposed 2012/2013 10-year residential permit forecast. (Est. Time: 1 Hr.)
Attachments: 1. A - 11-12 Approved Forecast 9/25/12, 2. B - Permit Forecast Presentation 9-25-12
Title
Department of Transportation recommending the Board approve the proposed 2012/2013 10-year residential permit forecast. (Est. Time: 1 Hr.)
Body
Fiscal Impact/Change to Net County Cost
There is no fiscal impact or change to net County Cost associated with this item.

Background
The amended General Plan policies passed by voters on November 5, 2008 require the development of a 10-Year Capital Improvement Program (CIP). One of the major funding sources for the CIP is revenue from the Traffic Impact Mitigation (TIM) Fee Program. The majority of the TIM Fee Program’s revenue comes from residential building permits. The Department of Transportation’s (Department) residential permit forecast process initiates the annual updating cycle for both the CIP and the TIM Fee Program.

The Department uses the residential permit forecast to estimate TIM Fee revenues programmed in the 10-Year CIP. This estimate is important because it may either encourage or discourage private development. Currently, Policy TC-Xf of the 2004 General Plan states that if a road improvement that is impacted by a proposed single family residential subdivision of five or more parcels is in the County’s 10-Year CIP, the developer’s TIM Fee may be adequate as a fair share payment. If the developer’s TIM Fee is not adequate, and the developer is required to construct the roadway, its construction costs may be eligible for reimbursement. For all other discretionary projects (i.e. commercial or multi-family developments), the above rules apply if a road improvement is in the County’s 20-Year CIP.

There are consequences of forecasting too high or too low. If the Department’s projected estimate is too high, the revenue forecast assumes the capacity to finance additional roadway projects in the 10-Year CIP. The Department may approve development projects conditioned on these additional roadway projects. If the actual permits received are lower than forecasted, the Department may not be able...

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